Mayon: Eruption is getting weaker

Mayon’s eruptive activity has continued to decline in the last 24 hours. Yesterday morning (local time) 3 paroxysmal eruptions with lava fountains were observed feeding lava flows. During the day, the eruption has become more effusive again. Most likely, the lava dome grows again and there are still 2 lava flows active. Collapse events on the fronts of the lava flows caused debris avalanches.. A pyroclastic flow was observed. Seismic and sulfur dioxide emissions are at the level of the previous day.

Mayon is still active

The Mayon in the Philippines continues to be active, but activity has slowed in the last few hours. PHILVOLCS reports 5 episodes of sporadic lava fountains. These lasted between 7 minutes and 1.24 hours. Glowing tephra is 600 meters above the crater. The lava fountains increased lava flows which flowed through the gullys. In addition, pyroclastic flows, debris avalanches and rockfalls were observed. Sulfur dioxide emissions increase to 2,466 tonnes. Whether growth of the lava dome continued, was not communicated.

Mayon: strong phreatomagmatic eruption

The larger volcanic eruption of yesterday, was (according to PHILVOLC) of phreatomagmatic origin, took 8 minutes and promoted an ash cloud, which rose 5 km above the summit level. Pyroclastic flows (or pyroclastic density flows, as they are now called) have been created and flowed through various drainage channels. They reached lengths of 4 km. Volcanic ash rained down in several villages. Videos show that it got so dark that cars had to drive with light and barely had visibility. The local airport was closed and flights were canceled. This was the Mayon’s strongest eruption to date in the current eruption phase.

Mayon: eruption increased

At the Philippine volcano Mayon, the eruption has increased significantly in the last few hours. PHILVOLCS upgraded the alarm status from 3 to 4. The exclusion zone has been enlarged to 8 km. A further increase in activity is likely. A brief message states that explosions and lava fountains emanate from the lava dome. The seismic have increased significantly. The VAAC Tokyo reports volcanic ash at 9 km altitude. MIROVA registers a very high thermal radiation of 1019 MW. The biggest danger are pyroclastic flows.

Colima: volcanic lightning

In November 2015 I captured this volcano footage from Colima in Mexico. Colmia was in a state of sporadic eruption from its main vent. The lava dome was blown out from explosions. So, instead of glowing avalances I observed volcanic lightning in the erupted ash clouds.

I traveled together with my colleagues from the Volcanological Society e.V. and meet with Hernando Alonso Rivera Cervantes who guided us. We rented a cabin, just 6 kilometers away from Colima’s summit.

More about Colima volcano

The Volcán de Colima is part of the Colima Volcanic Complex consisting of Volcán de Colima, Nevado de Colima and the eroded El Cantaro. It is the youngest of the three and is one of the most active volcanos in Mexico. It has erupted more than 40 times since 1576. 

During last years he activity was dominated by growth of an lava dome. In spring 2015 this dome was blown out by a series of explosions. Since then, explosive ash eruptions occur several time each day. This activity lasted several months. Then the explosions decreased and it began to grow a small dom again.

Kawah Ijen: blue burning sulfur

Incredible video footage of burning sulfur on Kawah Ijen in Java. Kawah Ijen volcano in Indonesia, is the own location you can certainly watch the electric blue fire of burning sulfur.

I traveled together with my indonesian friend and guide Andy. My friends Martin Rietze and Thorsten Böckel were also one of the party. We climbed the step crater walls short before sunset: just during night time the blue flames of the burning sulfur are visible.

About Kawah Ijen

The Ijen volcano complex is a group of stratovolcanoes in East Java, Indonesia. The volcanoes are inside a larger caldera, which is about 20 kilometers wide. Ijen volcano has a one-kilometer-wide acidic crater lake. The lake is the site of sulfur mining operation. Miners carried Sulfur-laden baskets by hand from the crater floor.

Bardarbunga: activity remains high

During last week, IMO maintained Aviation Colour Code Orange due to continued eruption at Bárdarbunga’s Holuhraun  fissure. Subsidence of the Bárdarbunga Caldera continued, and seismicity remained strong. Strongest earthquake under the central-volcano was M 5.4. The lava field was  more than 70 square kilometers on 9 November. Local air pollution from gas emissions persisted.
(Source: USGS / IMO)

Sakura-jima: activity elevated

JMA reported that nine explosions from Showa Crater at Sakurajima volcano ejected tephra as far as 1,300 m during last week. An explosive eruption on 7 November generated an ash plume that rose 3.5 km. An eruption later that day from Minami-Dake Crater produced a plume that rose 1.4 km. The Alert Level remained at 3. The Tokyo VAAC reported that during 5-8 November plumes rose to altitudes of 2.1-4.6 km.

Source: USGS / Smithsonian

Kilauea: Lava flow is still active

The June 27th lava flow remains active. The flow front is 14.9 km (9.3 miles) from the vent, and 170 m from the Kaohe Homesteads boundary. The actual length of the flow, measured along the lava tube is 17.1 km. Between September 10 and 12 the advance rate dropped to approximately 250 meters per day. The flow front is still in thick forest, creating smoke, but fires are not spreading away from the flow. (Source: HVO)